Vancouver police search for missing Indigenous woman


Mckenna Nakogee, 21, was last seen in downtown Vancouver on July 7 and was last in contact with her family on Monday, July 11

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The Vancouver Police Department has reported a second Indigenous woman missing in Vancouver.

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Police said Harrison had been in regular contact with family until March, when she texted her mom from the DTES.

There have been unconfirmed sightings of Harrison since then but she hasn’t cashed any government assistance cheques since April.

Surrey RCMP were the first to put out a news release on May 11 asking for information to help find her. Twenty days later the VPD put out a similar release.

If you have any information on Nakogee or Harrison’s whereabouts, please contact the Vancouver Police Missing Person Unit at 604-717-2530.

The Vancouver Police Department came under fire two weeks ago for its handling of the case of a missing 14-year-old Indigenous girl Noelle O’Soup, who was found dead in a Vancouver rooming house on May 1, 2022 — almost a year after she was reported missing. O’Soup was a member of the Key First Nation in Saskatchewan.

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The department was also criticized for its quick determination that a 24-year-old Indigenous woman whose remains were found in Shaughnessy 18-months after going missing was not suspicious.

The remains of Sheila Poorman’s daughter, Chelsea, were found outside a vacant mansion in Vancouver’s wealthy Shaughnessy neighbourhood on April 22.
The remains of Sheila Poorman’s daughter, Chelsea, were found outside a vacant mansion in Vancouver’s wealthy Shaughnessy neighbourhood on April 22. Photo by Arlen Redekop /PNG

Chelsea Poorman, a member of the Kawacatoose First Nation in Saskatchewan, was reported missing on Sept. 8, 2020. The case remained open until a contractor working at the property found her body on April 22.

Vancouver police announced the discovery soon after and said it appeared Poorman died around the time she disappeared, and her death was not suspicious.

The Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, or UBCIC, and B.C. First Nations Justice Council both cried foul, demanding a full investigation into Poorman’s disappearance and how she died.

More than 60 Indigenous woman have gone missing in Vancouver, many of whom were victims of serial killer Robert Pickton, who was jailed in 2007. The Vancouver Police Department later apologized for its handling of those cases.


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